Recap: DragonCon 2018

DragonCon 2018 – Military SFDragonCon is over. We must return to our normal lives. For some of us that means re-joining the muggle world and putting aside our alter-egos. I count myself among that number. (Though if the Fates are kind, it might not always be the way for me.) I was fortunate to be tapped for four panels this year. The last of which I was honored/challenged with being in the only female in a group of military sci-fi luminaries (Jack Campbell, Marc Alan Edelheit, Doug Dandridge, John D. Ringo, David Weber — moderated by Baen’s David Afsharirad). (See...
Don’t Blow Your Blurb

Don’t Blow Your Blurb

You’ve done all the heavy lifting (as in writing an 80,000 word novel). You’ve polished the prose, checked all your commas, formatted the ebook and even your roommate’s cat loves the cover art. For all intents and purposes, your ebook is ready to go. But wait! You’ve got to write your book’s description for the Amazon listing. For some hellish reason, you’re expected to summarize your blood, sweat and tears into a concise, compelling paragraph that will convince would-be readers to buy your book. It’s your sales pitch. It’s all come down to this. This is the reader’s introduction to...
When should you be aggressive about passive voice?

When should you be aggressive about passive voice?

Like any other writer that has the grammar and punctuation tools active while using Word, I’m sure you’ve seen the annoying blue squiggly line with the warning “passive voice, consider revising” message pop up in your editing. Most of the time (for me at least) I did not elect to phrase things that way; it just sort of happened. I don’t consciously think of verb tense when I write. It’s like driving into your day job; you go on auto-pilot. In retrospect, you may not even recall stopping for any traffic lights along the way (which is a bit frightening)....
Writing with ADD: the Pomodoro Technique

Writing with ADD: the Pomodoro Technique

Writing with ADD: the Pomodoro Technique Like many folks, it wasn’t until adulthood that I was diagnosed as an adult with ADD. With this discovery, a great many mysteries about my childhood (especially high school) were suddenly resolved. It explained my ability to “hyperfocus” on certain projects, becoming completely absorbed to the point of obsession while my attention would drift about erratically when it came to day-to-day events. To this end, I believe it’s why it took me nearly 10 years to finish my first book. It’s why I can recall verbatim all the dialogue from movies or TV shows...